Today I saw the president cry

Sam's tye-dye

Today I saw the president cry, the president of the United States of America. He cried at the thought of first graders like this young man being shot at in their own schools. He cried because our kids can’t feel safe in our country. He cried remembering all the places where kids have been killed because of untreated mental illness and unlimited access to assault weapons.

Today I saw our president cry, and a tear came to my own eyes as I watched with the seniors at Mercy Endeavors Senior Center. When he finished speaking we stood to give him a standing ovation for having the courage to act and take further steps toward controlling assault weapon purchases. We clapped for his commitment to continue funding mental illness treatment. And we clapped for a president who is human enough to be moved to tears by the needless loss of life in our country.

Today I saw a president cry for the first time in my life, and I rejoiced that we have a national leader who can be moved by his own humanity and empathy for our kids, kids like the young man in the picture above, whose life is so precious to me.

May the God of enlightenment and wisdom guide us now to do all we can to promote brotherly and sisterly love, to bring peace in our time, to practice loving our neighbors as ourselves, and to quit believing that strapping guns on everyone could possibly be the will of the Lover of our souls. May we act with courage and take every step we can to protect the lives of those who cannot protect themselves. And may we be as passionate, human, and empathic as our president was today so that we too can cry for our lost kids and work for kids’ safety through loving-kindness.

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About soulcare4u

I am the author of Monks in the World: Seeking God in a Frantic World, published by Wipf & Stock and available through Amazon.com; and of a blog on Wordpress.com, "A Contemplative Path." I serve as the founding spiritual director of The School for Contemplative Living (www.thescl.net), adjunct faculty of Loyola University, and as a pastoral counselor and spiritual director in private practice.
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